StoneHammer Brewing – Guelph Brewery Crawl Part 3/3

Part three of our three-part Guelph, Ontario craft brewery crawl. 

Our third and final Guelph stop was to StoneHammer Brewing. You may know them under their previous name, F&M Brewing (StoneHammer was the product line). Regardless, they’ve been making their brand of all-natural, hand-crafted, fine-brewed ales and lagers for 20 years.

In fact, it was StoneHammer Dark Ale that first sparked Josh’s love for craft beer, so he’d been particularly eager to visit and check it out.

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The Place

StoneHammer is tucked away inside a quiet commercial-industrial park, designed for utility more than aesthetics. Not very pretty, but it does the job. Inside, it’s set up like a storefront rather than a bar/hang-out. A few fridges, a table with a register, and a tiny serving area. We weren’t lucky enough to get a tour the day we went, but there were tastings.

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The Beers

We came between any of their seasonals and one-offs, so it was just their five year-round signature pours up for sampling. Samples were free, so we tried a bit of each.

  • Light Lager: We’ll be honest – neither of us particularly like light beer, nor do we drink it. That said, this one is certainly an improvement over the major commercial offerings.
  • Pilsner: There’s not much to say about a pilsner – it’s simple, crisp, and either done right or done wrong. This one is definitely done right.
  • Pale Ale: This is a brew you won’t get anywhere else. Yes, beer has a “terroir” just like wine does – the flavour of this one comes from Guelph’s unique municipal water, heavy on limestone, which gives it an almost savoury quality. Perhaps a bit of an acquired taste, but definitely worth trying.
  • Dark Ale: Easily the best of all. It has a malty aroma and a toasty flavour that anyone who enjoys a dark beer will certainly appreciate
  • Oatmeal Coffee Stout: One of the better blends of beer and coffee that we’ve tried. The oatmeal gives it a sweetness almost like a regular coffee at your favourite shop.

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The Extras

Stone Hammer is pretty much bells-and-whistles free. There’s a rack of t-shirts, but not much beyond that. But hey, look at that shelf of awards!

Visit Date: October 9, 2015 

Post 1 in the Guelph Brewery Crawl – Royal City Brewing: http://hoppily-ever-after.com/2015/11/03/royal-city-brewing-guelph/

Post 2 in the Guelph Brewery Crawl – Wellington Brewery – http://hoppily-ever-after.com/2015/11/12/wellington-brewery-guelph/

Kitchener-Waterloo Oktoberfest at the Schwaben Club

Since we couldn’t make it to Germany this year, we did the next best thing. We popped down the highway to Kitchener (once known as Berlin), which has Canada’s largest German community, and the second largest Oktoberfest celebration in the world. The first, of course, being Munich itself.

Jessica had been to the Kitchener-Waterloo Oktoberfest before, but only to a couple of the big festhallen. Josh was a first-timer, and we knew we wanted to get that holy grail of tickets: to one of the city’s authentic German clubs. They sell out early each year, so you have to be quick on the draw.

Luckily, we found a pair of tickets to the Schwaben Club. They had two rooms running for the ‘Fest: the larger Main Hall, and the smaller Schwaben Hall, where we ended up. It didn’t disappoint. 

Oktoberfest Crowd

All colourful pennants and half-timbered-style ceiling, the hall had everything that comes to mind when you think of when you think of Oktoberfest. Beer? Oom-pah-pah band? Servers in dirndls and lederhosen? Guests in dirndls and lederhosen? Sauerkraut, schnitzel and bratwurst? Jawohl!

Steve Angel Band
The Steve Angel Band in their lederhosen’d best

ZWEI BIER, BITTE!

We have to admit: we worried about finding good beer with the Molson sponsorship. But fortunately we found two interesting options in the Hall: Big Rock Brewery’s Traditional Ale and Rickard’s Lederhosen. Big Rock’s “Trad” is a medium English brown ale with a nutty malt flavour. Definitely not Oktoberfest-style, but a tasty brew. Lederhosen, on the other hand, is a traditional märzen (the iconic lager of Oktoberfest). It didn’t quite measure up to some of the craft märzen‘s we’ve had this autumn, but it was welcome at the Fest – and undeniably in style.

That is NOT Canadian in the glass on the right.
That is NOT Canadian in the glass on the right.

One of the benefits of being at a proper German club was that we had options. The Schwaben Club continues to run their open-to-the-public Bier Keller (cellar beer bar) downstairs during Oktoberfest. And they’ve got a good variety of offerings from Paulaner and Hacker-Pschorr. We both went for Paulaner’s Hefe-Weizen as a change from our upstairs brews.

DAS ESSEN

Oh, the food. Another major benefit of going for an authentic club – real, homecooked  German food.  It must have taken forever to bake all that Apfel-Strudel, not to mention tenderizing all that schnitzel. But boy, was it worth it. Beyond the main meal options (schnitzel, sausage, sauerkraut, potato salad, coleslaw, strudel, etc), they also came around with baskets of warm pretzels, which we definitely indulged in. 

 

Apple strudel
Fresh baked apple strudel

DIE EXTRAS

The Schwaben has what we think is the ideal ‘Fest vibe: a blend of young and old – the university students, the grey-haired crowd, and beyond. We ended up chatting with a group of folks from another Schwaben Club in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and then a group of recently-legal university students who’d never heard of sauerkraut. Everyone got along, chatted at their long tables. And dance.

The dancing brought everyone together. Lots of accordion, horns, polka, chicken dance, and the regular necessity: Zicke-Zacke-Zicke-Zacke-Hoi-Hoi-Hoi!

At 11pm, the lights turned on, and we thought we were kicked out. But no! Instead, a special and unexpected treat: traditional German dancers folk-dancing away to German techno. . . and Du Hast.

Imagine the sounds of Rammstein to this country dance.
Imagine the sounds of Rammstein to this country dance.