Tips on Dealing with Women in the Craft Beer World

As I see more news of women carving out spaces for themselves within the beer world (cases in point: the Society of Beer Drinking LadiesBarley’s Angels, International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day, and the soon-to-start Iron Beer Maidens), I can’t help thinking about why this is necessary. As a woman involved in the beer industry, my view is that despite forward strides, beer – and yes, even craft beer – still has a lot of the “boys club” mentality. Here are some of my personal tips to help challenge assumptions about women and beer.

#1: Don’t Assume That Women Don’t Drink Beer

Some women drink beer.  Some drink wine. Some don’t drink at all. And it’s all good, because: people are different! Overly simplistic, maybe, but not everyone seems to get that first part in particular.

Real Life Example: I’m buying a special beer package that I’m excited about and then I’m asked – by another woman, in fact –  who would be the lucky recipient: could it be my husband, my boyfriend, or perhaps my father? My response: tight smile, vague guilt, as I admit that actually, it’s for me.

Oops; I forgot that women drink wine and men are the ones that drink beer! I always get that one confused. It must be my personal failing that I can’t seem to properly enjoy a rosé. You know, despite the fact that for thousands of years, women not only drank the beer but, as brewing was a household task, they brewed it. I’m not even going to get into the fact that men also definitely enjoy wine too.

The marketing noise from the macro breweries with the subtle-as-a-sledgehammer hints that “their beer will get you all the sexy ladies” seems to have died off a bit, but that doesn’t mean that breweries are getting it all right.  It may not be disrespect, but it’s not quite understanding the full consumer base.  Maybe a boob joke isn’t really that funny to a large portion of potential customers? (Kudos to Ben Johnson for calling out a bunch of brands for sexist marketing – some of whom have since changed their names and labels).

International Women Collaboration Brew Day at Folly Brewpub, March 2017

#2 Don’t Assume Women Only Like Certain Types of Beer

Real Life Example: I’m at a beer festival when a fellow imbiber – male, this time – tells me that “Women like darker beer while men like hoppier beer.” My reaction: gentle puzzlement and a poor attempt to refute it as I enjoy my delightfully malty, dark beverage. 

The dominant message in mainstream marketing may be that women like light and fruity (or need a specific beer for women, which thankfully got destroyed on social media). But apparently some otherwise open-minded folks seem to enforce gendered drinking differences.

What differences may actually exist? Well apparently, scientifically speaking, there may actually be some tasting differences between men and women. Given the same training, a woman might be able to detect a taste or smell earlier. It won’t necessarily pan out to a stout vs. IPA preference.

My lesson here: women all have different tastes! In fact, you might even see them as a diverse pool of unique individuals.

Dark or light or anything in between – all appropriate for women

#3 Don’t Assume Women Don’t Know Details About Beer

Real Life Example: I’m at a brewery, and I ask about a certain beer they have on tap. They tell me it’s “bitter” and “hoppy”. A couple minutes later I hear Josh ask about the same beer . But he doesn’t get vague generalities, he gets the details. Something like “It’s 45 IBUs and made with Citra and Mosaic hops*. . . ” 

This gets me feeling frustrated and powerless. It’s one thing when a bartender starts from scratch because they don’t know what level of understanding you have about beer. It’s another thing when a bartender treats a woman and a man differently when they’re asking the exact same question.

Again, it’s the same as the last two points. Don’t treat a customer or fellow beer drinker differently just because they happen to be female. You never know how much of a beer buff they are.

Working as a Beer Coordinator at an I Heart Beer Festival, with Heather from Hamilton Small Fries as Food Coordinator

#4 Don’t Assume Women are Comfortable in that “Boys Club” Environment

When something ends up dominated by one gender for so long, sometimes even the most well-meaning people can forget about how little things like the use of language can be exclusionary to others.

Real Life Example: A common acronym for wife/girlfriend/female partner in homebrewing forums and mailing lists (and apparently other male-dominated internet domains, like yachting forums) is SWMBO. She Who Must Be Obeyed. I get it, it’s a joke. But it feels very much 50’s sitcom gender roles style, like “I’ve got to deal with this controlling nag of a wife and if I don’t do what she says, it’s the dog house for me”.  For a female trying to participate, it makes you feel excluded. 

Then of course there’s the very important point that beyond discomfort, there can sometimes even be a fear for safety. Sometimes, in groups where there are too many tipsy dudes, women just might not feel safe. That is almost definitely a part of the allure of the all-ladies events springing up lately.

Though this article includes some stories of frustrating scenarios, it by no means includes my whole experience in craft beer. I’ve met so many amazing people – men and women – and for the most part everyone tries their best to be inclusive, kind, and open.

~Jessica Gaber

Hoppily Ever After’s Best Beer “Stuff” 2017

We’ve done the beer itself, but craft beer tends to be such a movement that there’s so many other things going on. Here’s a few of our favourites from 2017.

Best Beer Experience Overall

Organizing a Beer Festival For the First Time.  We got recruited to be the “Beer Coordinators” for the first I Heart Beer Festival in Hamilton, February 2017. We took all of our beer and Ontario brewery knowledge and ran with it, learning a lot along the way. We also did Beer Coordination for the April 2017 festival in Guelph.  Unfortunately we then had to step back from our role as I Heart Beer was growing more than we could participate in with day jobs. Congrats to the team on expanding throughout Southern Ontario though – we were proud to attend the Hamilton I Heart Beer Christmas fest as guests rather than hosts, and see how much it had grown.

Hamilton I Heart Beer Festival

Honourable mention: Prud’homme’s Level 1 course. Yes, we’re now certified Beer Enthusiasts (as opposed to before when were were un-certified beer enthusiasts). This course was great and we’d recommend it to both a novice to beer and those with a bit more experience such as the two of us. Our hope is to be able to attend one of the Level 2 courses in 2018 en route to becoming full Beer Sommeliers.

Best Beer Fest

(Not counting the ones we coordinated, of course). 

Because Beer, Hamilton. We’ve been going since the 2014 inaugural year (see our post on it here), and it never fails to impress. It has a great brewery selection dedicated to Ontario craft, a lovely location by the water, and smooth timing and logistics. As a non-niche festival it works for a general audience – including us. The beautiful weather this year made it even better.

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Honourable mention: Funkfest, Sawdust City Brewery, Gravenhurst. One of the niche festivals, this one is entirely dedicated to funky, sour, farmhouse, and barrel-aged beers.  Totally up our alley. It’s a really fun festival – for brewers as well it seems – and is worth the trek to Gravenhurst.

Best Beer-Related Paraphernalia

Pretty Pennie Jewellery Hop Necklace. After lusting after it all year, the solid brass hop necklace was Jessica’s Christmas present from Josh. A local artisan out of Cambridge, you’ll often see Pretty Pennie Jewellery at all sorts of local craft and/or beer shows. They’re gorgeous in person too!

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Honourable Mention: Brewcrafters GameFun game play and maybe frustratingly realistic about how little money you have left at the end of the “year” – yikes! Very chit-heavy in the set-up though, but once we got things organized the most logical way in their baggies, it was a bit better.

Best Brewery- Visiting Experience

Valentino’s Restaurant, Hamilton. Some Hamiltonians might be surprised to see this old standard Italian restaurant on our brewery list, but it’s our favourite place for pasta AND a pint. The Westdale location brews for the restaurant, and both locations will generally have their flagship Bohemian Ale along with a seasonal. Most recently it was a Lemon Stout and we’ve also seen beers like a Cream Ale, Boreal Brown Winter Ale, and more.

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Honourable mention: Neustadt Springs Brewery, Neustadt. In an old brewery building from 1859 inside a really charming village, Neustadt Springs feels like a bit of a holdover from an older age of beer. They don’t have any food or a license to serve pints, but you can sample their beer. We spent a bit of time and chatted with the proprietors – some of the few remaining founding members of the Ontario Craft Brewers Association. Their 10w30 Brown Ale has always been a favourite but a visit exposed us to others like their very tasty Sour Kraut Lager, a raspberry sour.

Best Beer News

The Expansion of Beer in Hamilton. We love travelling Ontario – and beyond – to tour breweries, but it’s really exciting for us to finally have a good selection of breweries right at home. Collective Arts has become the oldest Hamilton brewery with a physical location, and Shawn & Ed has been trucking along Dundas for a little while, but 2017 saw Merit, Grain & Grit, and Fairweather Brewing all open in Hamilton. Great news for local beer lovers! We’ve heard that Rust City Brewery is getting close to actually being able to brew, and Clifford Brewing has a place which is so close to opening. We predict 2018 will be another great year for local beer nerds.

Crowds at Grain & Grit
Crowds at Grain & Grit

Honourable mention: Online Ordering from Breweries. This is a great piece of beer news we haven’t yet taken advantage of, but our new year is going to be filled with beautiful deliveries from far-flung breweries. We’ve been drooling over Instagram pics of other people’s orders from breweries like Dominion City and Half Hours on Earth.

Did we miss any amazing 2017 beer experiences?

 

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Our Very Beer-filled Oktoberfest Wedding

What happens when two craft beer bloggers get married? Apparently, an Oktoberfest wedding!

Prost!
Prost! We’ve got mugs of Brock Street Brewing’s Traditional Irish Red Ale.

We didn’t just choose Oktoberfest because it’s an excuse for an amazing party with comfort food, rollicking music, and good beer (though those things definitely contributed), but also because the very first Oktoberfest was a royal wedding. In 1810, Crown Prince Ludwig I of Bavaria married Princess Therese von Saxe Hildburghausen, with massive celebrations and horse races in Munich. The people enjoyed it so much, they kept it up year after year. We tried to imitate a classy Bavarian wedding vibe, but left out the horse races.

Princess Therese & Prince Ludwig - we certainly wouldn't want to imitate their marriage though, just the wedding
Princess Therese & Prince Ludwig – we tried to imitate their wedding, but want to avoid imitating their marriage. Older royal marriages were apparently not often happy ones.

One of the ways we incorporated our love for local craft beer was by using growlers as our centrepieces. Along with German table numbers and votive candles, we just ordered loose seasonal flowers and filled the growlers. All 19 tables had different breweries that we had visited.

Do you know the breweries on display at these two tables?

Our Oktoberfest theme showed up in a lot of places from the delicious schnitzel and spaetzle served a a main course, the apple strudel standing in for wedding cake, the live band in lederhosen and dirndls, the late night pretzels, and German phrases slipped here and there.

Lebkuchenherzen favours, which are gingerbread hearts that sweethearts traditionally give each other. "Schatzi" means "little treasure"
Our favours were Lebkuchenherzen, which are gingerbread hearts that sweethearts in Germany give each other during festivals. “Schatzi” translates roughly to “little treasure”

The bridesmaids wore “dirndls”, which is the traditional Bavarian outfits. These were custom-made for us.

Dirndls & bride

The ceremony also had a taste of beer and Oktoberfest – literally. We did a modified version of the loving cup, or quaich (“quake”) ritual. An ancient friendship and love tradition with roots in multiple cultures, it became a common wedding ritual when King James VI of Scotland presented it to Anne of Denmark on their 1589 wedding day – another royal wedding! A quaich is actually a wide, two-handled mug, but we substituted a German stein we had bought in Germany. The ritual was three small sips each: to our love in the past, in the present, and in the future.

Hofbrau = "Royal brew". We visited Hofbrauhaus in May
Hofbrau translates to “royal brew”. Yes, more European royalty. We visited Munich’s Hofbrauhaus together in May, so this was particularly meaningful.

And of course, there was the beer! We did our own bar set-up so we could do our own beer choices. We figured out we wanted to work between Ontario craft and German classics, and aim for four varieties: a lager, a wheat, a darker, and a “quirkier”. After much debate, here’s what we ended up with:

  • Side Launch Mountain Lager – We got about half lager, and that worked, as there was none to take home the next day! We would have only gotten MORE beer, and less wine for a wedding like this
  • Erdinger Weissbier – It was more popular than we assumed, and our amounts were gone by the end of cocktail hour.
  • Brock Street Brewing Traditional Irish Red Ale – We actually won a keg from them, so we had some family make the trek to Whitby to pick it up, since we’re big fans of this dark and smoky red. The bar wasn’t as used to keg pouring, but got the hang of it after a while.
  • Collective Arts Sour Harvest Saison – Our choice of something a little different to bring basic beer drinkers out of their shells. We got our wish and quite a few people tried it, but we still had a decent amount to take home (not that we’re complaining)
We also got to use the big Lowenbrau lions as decor. Sehr gut!
We also got to use the big Lowenbrau lions as decor/drinking buddies. Sehr gut!

 

Wondering where we got something? Here’s our vendor list: 

Pairing Beer with Hearty German Comfort Food

Food and beer pairing doesn’t get the recognition it deserves. We hear a lot about pairing the right foods with the right wine, but not enough about the true diversity of beers, and how the right combination can create a unique dining experience. With the explosion of craft breweries lately, we think it’s time that beer and food pairing steps into the limelight.

Brewers’ Plate

That’s why we were thrilled by the Brewers’ Plate event in Toronto back in May. They get it! With a classy rock ‘n’ roll theme (wear your concert tees and blazers), it brought local restaurants and breweries together to show us how it’s done.

Brewers Plate, Toronto, Hoppily Ever After

Inspired by the event, we at Hoppily Ever After and Heather from Hamilton Small Fries decided to cook up a beer pairing feast of our own.

Beer Pairing 101

We started with the most basic rule in beer and food pairing: match strength with strength. You don’t want the strength of either the beer or food to overpower the other. To put it in the language of cheese, don’t match your Imperial stout with a creamy, mild Brie. But you might want to match it with a sharp old cheddar.

Though we usually default to aiming for complementing flavours, there’s actually three C’s of beer pairing: 

  • Complement – pair similar flavour profiles (e.g.  chocolate cake with sweet stout, Southern brisket and rauchbier)
  • Contrast – pair opposite flavour profiles, to bring out the flavours of the other (e.g. spicy food and malty beer, salty food and sour beer)
  • Cut – pair something that can cut through a dish’s richer flavours (e.g. spicy food and hoppy beer)

And in thinking about the three C’s, don’t forget all the flavour elements you could have. To start with: the malt, the hops, the carbonation? What about added flavours like fruit, herbs & spices, or chocolate? How about acidity, salt, or heat levels?

Beer sampling glasses, Hoppily Ever After
Preparing our varied collection of sample glasses

The Food & Beer Pairing Feast

We couldn’t resist a classic beer-producing region as our starting point: Germany. We had the benefit of Heather‘s epic cookbook collection as our starting point. Luckily, she had the perfect vintage German cookbook.

Beer and German food pairing, Hoppily Ever After

Main Course

Our main course was Schweinskoteletten mit Knackwurst und Kartoffeln – that’s Pork Chops with Knackwurst and Potatoes, for those not from the Old Country. We substituted Bockwurst (like a German-style hot dog rather than the more intense sausage-flavour you might picture) for the Knackwurst, and no one knew the difference.

German stew, Beer, Hoppily Ever After

We chose Old Tomorrow’s Track 85 Lagered Ale as our beer, and it was a very successful pairing. With the smoothness of a ale, and the crispness of a lager, this German-style Altbier complemented the mild pork chops, potato, and bockwurst, and contrasted the acidity and sweetness of the tomatoes and Gherkins in the dish (yes, Gherkins).

Vegetable Side Dish

The veggie side we chose was Bohnensalat, or “French” Bean Salad. A salad with a witbier is usually a good bet for a complementary pairing, with oil/vinegar/spices of the food matching the citrus/spices of the beer.

Food and beer pairing, Hoppily Ever After

Black Oak’s Beat the Heat, a Belgian style witbier, fit the bill perfectly. The citrus and coriander of this light, classic Wit perfectly complemented the tanginess of the beans.

Dessert

We picked up an apple strudel at Denninger’s, our local German and international grocery store. We aimed for a Hefeweizen that we thought might be a complementary flavour. Unfortunately, this was a match that didn’t work as well. The apple strudel was delicious, the beer was delicious. But together? They just didn’t really pair well.

Food and beer pairing, Hoppily Ever After

Refined Fool’s My Cousin Knows the Drummer hefeweizen, with its cloudy light gold tone, definitely looks the part. However we found it a bit more sour than the hefeweizens we were used to. This meant it wasn’t a perfect match for the sweetness of the strudel, but it also wasn’t far enough into sour territory to contrast. Doing this again, we’d find something malty to complement the warmth and sweetness of the strudel, or perhaps a sessionable IPA to contrast. Or, we’d have My Cousin Knows the Drummer with something like a lemon meringue pie!

Details

Want to learn more about the food in these posts? Check out Heather’s post at Hamilton Small Fries

Brewers Plate, Hoppily Ever AfterCheck out the Brewers Plate! Fun event, food & beer, and it’s for a good case. This year they raised $9,000 for War Child. #rocktheplate

Finally, this October, Jessica from here at Hoppily Ever After, and Heather from Hamilton Small Fries will be leading two tours during Hamilton’s new culinary week, NOSH Week! Find our “Paired: A Food and Beer Pairing Tour”, and “Spooky Spirits: A Cocktail and Food Pairing Tour” on Thursday October 20 and 21, 2016.